Calcium After Eliminating Dairy

I want to free my diet of dairy to facilitate fat loss, what would be the way to make up for calcium (other than sun light ). Is there any suppliment I can take ?
Answer:
The best food source of calcium out there is that from raw milk (NOT conventional, pasteurized milk) and other raw dairy products. if you have dairy issues then dont rely on dairy for calcium. Removing conventional dairy from your diet is a good idea. Pasteurised dairy isn;t left with anything good the body can not get from other better sources. 
Secondly, add in Dark green, leafy vegetables are another great source of calcium but this should not be your sole source of calcium.
Of course, it’s not just calcium that you’re better off getting from whole foods and smart supplements, it’s all nutrients. Your best choice is always to favor getting nutrients the way nature intended.
Vitamin D is also important for calcium absorption, so along with your raw milk and vegetables, make sure that you are getting plenty of safe sun exposure, or supplement vitamin D3 supplement, but you will need to monitor your levels if you choose this route. Because of vitamin D’s role in calcium absorption, adequate vitamin D levels help to prevent osteoporosis and hip fractures.
For proper D3 absoprtion you need to have K2. this should be supplemented properly to make dure D3 gets its job done and is bio-available instead of just floating around and getting stuck in the wrong plces – literally it will clog your arteries.
Supplementing with calcium is nonetheless the best option to make sure your body is getting the raw materials it needs. The best multivitamin which comes with the complete range of micro-nutrients is Pure One Multivitamin – you need just one pill daily. 
Main point: it’s not just calcium you need to focus on. calcium does not work properly on its own. you need the full spectrum of vitamins and minerals for all of them to be absorbed.

Basic Strength Training & Weight Loss

Questions:

1. When someone is strength training, can they gain weight?
2. Is strength training an effective way to weight loss?
3. If I have a cup of rice everyday , will that affect my weight loss negatively? (I know this question is just too specific lol)

 

Answers:

1. When someone is strength training, can they gain weight?

Yes in the beginning there is a slight increase in weight due to muscle mass returning to original mass. But don’t let this scare you. When a female weight trains she will not get bulky like a man due to oestrogen levels. Rather, weight training allows for more muscle gains which burns more calories even when you are resting. This increase in metabolic rate is due to the new muscle mass requiring more nutrients to sustain itself. This is the magic of weight training for women that results in a toned and slimmer body. 

Also, you may notice one thing, as you continue weight training, you may not lose weight on the scale but your body will slim down and get toned. This is again due to more muscle mass. Don’t forget that muscle weight more than fat but is less voluminous as easily seen in the below cool photo.

cool-comparison-pounds-fat-versus-muscle

Personal experience – when I started weight training 6 years ago, I weight 69 kilos. AFter a few months my weight shot up to 73 kilos. Normally I panicked! As I continue training my weight came down to 63 kg within first 12 months of training. And now after 5 years I am still at 63 kilos. Yes the same weight for 5 years. Does this mean I have no results? Hell no, I am gaining muscle and losing fat simultaneously. Muscle gains can be confirmed by my strength gains and me being able to lift more weights. And I am losing body fat becasue I see my body toning out and clothes feeling lose. 

So the point of the story, don’t focus on the number on the scale. Your aesthetic gains are enough to see how far you have come along on your journey.
2. Is strength training an effective way to weight loss?

HELL YES. The same reason that you gain weight at first then quickly lean out is a great way to explain that weight training is the best form to burn fat. Think of your muscles as engines for burning fat. Larger muscles are larger engines for burning more fat. Strength training coupled with diet and cardio burns fat far more than cardio and diet alone. 

Professional fitness models strip away the fat through diet and training, which consists of weight training at higher reps with shorter rest periods. This sort of training induces a large increase of growth hormone (GH) in your body. GH is a potent fat loss hormone and a very mild anabolic.

Larger muscles also burn more calories when activated. So you are looking at working on your daily workout routines which involves all the large muscle groups in your body:

Upper body – 

  • Arms 
  • Shoulders
  • Upper, mid and lower back
  • Chest
  • Traps

Lower Body –

  • Quads 
  • hammies
  • Glutes
  • Calves

Working these muscles means you are pushing your central nervous system into the next gear. Your entire body is now working to help you lift and perform better. Couple this with proper nutrition plan and smart cardio and you are turning your body into a fat burning machine. 

But don’t forget to do some smart cardio. Smart Cardio is what I call doing your cardio effectively where it burns only fat and saves the muscle. So does this mean that other forms of cardio may not be burning fat? Yes that’s right. Cardio is notorious for burning fat and muscle at the same time – and if you didn’t already know then muscle if your best friend that you don’t wanna lose. Smart cardio is basically HIIT which targets fat burn and saves the muscles – scientifically proven too. HIIT sessions are short, sweet & sweaty and you can expect to see results in 3 weeks. Don’t quit then tho, keep going and see what your body can do!

 

3. If I have a cup of rice everyday , will that affect my weight loss negatively? (I know this question is just too specific lol)

Rice is carbs, and based on your goals you can either ruin your journey or make it better through carbs. Carbs are not bad. Some carbs are very useful and we should have it. Carbs that are harmful include inflammation causing carbs such as gluten containing foods, processed foods, sugar, junk foods etc. 

Rice is a moderately slow digesting carbs, and having it in the right time of the day is going to help you. If you weight training, have your carbs before weight training which is going to give you the energy you need. If you go heavy then have a small amount of carbs right after training. Don’t delay your carbs and have them at night. Eat as quickly as you can after your workout, and be sure to eat adequate amount of protein to help you get gains. 

Over eating your carbs will lead to fat gain. carbs will get digested and when too much is in the blood stream it gets stored inside fat cells. So it is a good idea to spread your carbs out throughout the day and eat smaller portions. On days you are not weight training or working our, eat less carbs to balance out. 

How much carbs you need depends on your specific body type, hormones, medical history, lifestyle etc. You can check out Lean Out Programme if you need help setting specific goals. 


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What is Glutathione and How Do I Get More of It?

Written by

This articlewas originally published on drhyman.com

GLUTATHIONE (pronounced “gloota-thigh-own”) is the most important molecule you need to stay healthy and prevent aging, cancer, heart disease, dementia and more, and necessary to treat everything from autism to Alzheimer’s disease. I called it the mother of all antioxidants.

glutathione.jpg

The good news is that your body produces its own glutathione. The bad news is that toxins from poor diet, pollution, toxins, medications, stress, trauma, aging, infections and radiation all deplete your glutathione.

This leaves you susceptible to unrestrained cell disintegration from oxidative stress, free radicals, infections and cancer. And your liver gets overloaded and damaged, making it unable to do its job of detoxification.

How does it work? The secret of glutathione is the sulfur (SH) chemical groups it contains. Sulfur is a sticky, smelly molecule. It acts like fly paper and all the bad things in the body stick onto it, including free radicals and toxins like mercury and other heavy metals. Normally glutathione is recycled in the body — except when the toxic load becomes too great. And that explains why we are in such trouble.

But as I said, there is also good news. You can do many things to increase this natural and critical molecule in your body and here are four ways to start today:

4 Tips to Boost your Glutathione Levels

  1. 1. Consume sulfur-rich foods. The main ones in the diet are garlic, onions and the cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, kale, collards, cabbage, cauliflower, watercress, etc).

 

  1. 2. Try bioactive whey protein. This is great source of cysteine and the amino acid building blocks for glutathione synthesis. As you know, I am not a big fan of dairy. 

 

  1. 3. Exercise boosts your glutathione levels and thereby helps boost your immune system, improve detoxification and enhance your body’s own antioxidant defenses. Start slow and build up to 30 minutes a day of vigorous aerobic exercise like walking or jogging, or play various sports. Strength training for 20 minutes 3 times a week is also helpful.

 

  1. 4. Take Glutathione Supporting Supplements. One would think it would be easy just to take glutathione as a pill, but the body digests protein — so you wouldn’t get the benefits if you did it this way. However, the production and recycling of glutathione in the body requires many different nutrients and you CAN take these.

 

If you found this article helpful, share with your family and friends!

Yohimbine HCL – The Super Fat Burner Supplement

Yohimbine HCL is the synthetic version of Yohimbine extract from the yohimbe tree. Yohimbine HCL safer and results proven, due to its highly controlled dosages. 

Yohimbe (the tree and bark, and its subset yohimbine (the extract), are fat-burning compounds, primarily used to lose fat during short term fasting.

Yohimbine is found naturally occurring primarily as an alkaloid in the Pausinystalia yohimbe tree (sometimes referred to as Corynanthe yohimbe), and can be found in the plant known as Rauwolfia Serpentina,  as well as the Rauwolfia family of plants in general.

Yohimbine, as a molecule, is sometimes also referred to as aphordine, corynine, hydroaergotocin, and quebrachine.

Yohimbine is also an aphrodisiac and can aid erectile dysfunction in men only. This does not affect women. It is also a general stimulant and energy booster. 

Yohimbine works by increasing adrenaline levels in the body, as well as inhibiting a regulatory process in fat cells – mainly stubborn fat cell receptors, which normally suppresses fat burning.

The effects of yohimbine HCL are ineffective if taken with a high carbohydrate diet, which is why Y-HCL should be taken in a fasted state.

Recommended Dosage & Active Amounts

Dosages of 0.2mg/kg bodyweight have been successfully used to increase fat burning without significant implications on cardiovascular parameters like heart rate and blood pressure. This results in a dosage of:

  • 14 mg for a 150lb person
  • 18 mg for a 200lb person
  • 22 mg for a 250lb person

Supplementation is most effective between meals or during short term fasting.

Caution should be exercised at higher body weight, since the cardiovascular system may not be prepared to handle the stimulation from Y-HCL. When supplementing Y-HCL for the first time, always start with a half-dose and assess tolerance before proceeding.

When pairing yohimbine with other stimulatory agents, half-dose both supplements and work up to the recommended dose cautiously, as two supplements can interact negatively.

Sleep

Y-HCL does not affect sleep.

Fat Mass and Obesity

Y-HCL is an antagonist (Inactivation) of the Alpha-2-Adrenergic receptors preserves fat burning effects mediated via other mechanisms, a negation of a suppressive effect that ultimately results in more lipolysis (fat burning)

Yohimbine acts upon the adrenergic receptor system of fat cells, which regulate thermogenesis. The beta-subunits of the adrenergic receptors (targets of ephedrine) can be seen as stimulatory for fat loss as they increase the activity of the enzyme Adenyl Cyclase and subsequently cAMP levels (mainly via the b1 and b2 subunits; with b3 being less active in humans). The alpha-subunits are more suppressive of fat metabolism, in which their activation reduces activity of Adenyl Cyclase and reduces cAMP levels (specifically alpha-2). Yohimbine is a selective alpha-2 adrenergic receptor antagonist (inactivator), which inhibits activation of the suppressive set of receptors and preserves Adenyl Cyclase activity and the effects mediated via the beta receptors.

Beyond that, yohimbine itself can potentially induce fat loss vicariously through the release of adrenaline; adrenaline itself is an activator of beta-adrenergic receptors.

One study has been conducted with Yohimbine in elite soccer players taking 10mg yohimbine twice a day (20mg total) for a period of 21 days noted that, after the diet was controlled for, that fat percentage was decreased from 9.3+/-1.1% to 7.1+/-2.2% (assessed via calipers), while placebo experienced a nonsignificant increase.

0.2mg/kg Yohimbine in otherwise healthy men appears to enhance the fat burning effects of endogenous noradrenaline, and appears to be more effective during periods of exercise and attenuated if given beta-blockers; another study noted this attenuation to be measured at 70%.

 

Caution Notice

  • Y- HCL can cause extreme anxiety in individuals predisposed to anxiety. Yohimbine may trigger manic psychosis or suicidal episodes in people with bipolar disorder
  • Yohimbine can interact with a large amount of neurological medications and should not be used in conjunction with these medication without consultation with a doctor.
  • Y-HCL is not for pregnant women and those who are breastfeeding.

Yohimbine and Anxiety

If you are predisposed to anxiety, then taking Y-HCL may increase your chances of anxiety attacks.

One study that measured anxiety via EEG (using the frontal midline theta pulse as biomarker) noted that participants with less anxiety at baseline that recieving 15mg yohimbine did not influence anxiety as measured by either EEG or self-report, while those with higher baseline anxiety experienced an exacerbation of anxiety on both measures; general arousal was increased in both groups.

Stress and Panic

Due to effectively increasing noradrenaline, the neural side-effects of excess noradrenaline may result if too high a dose is taken; the most common are anxiety and panic disorders, with the later affecting susceptable persons.

This increase in anxiety may be a per se effect of yohimbine in excess, as 30mg yohimbine can induce anxiety acutely in otherwise healthy persons (assessed by the Visual Analogue Scale for Anxiety), opioid dependent persons, and in persons who are susceptable to panic attacks; where yohimbine may be able to induce panic attacks.

Do not take Y-HCL more than the recommended dosage. 

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Air fryers, Microwaves and Freezing Foods

I had few questions! Please make some time to answer them:

1. Are air fryers any good? Is deep frying bad? My kids love french fries.

2. I read somewhere that reheating certain foods like chicken, eggs, tomatoes makes them toxic and not good for health. So they advised not to microwave or heat in the stove. Instead we should take them out in the room temperature. How true is this?

3. I don’t want to cook everyday. can I cook Chicken, Beef and Fish and freeze them? I will eat within 5days. will it affect the nutritional value??

 

Answer:
1. air fryers – very expensive and yes good because you dont have to use too much oil for  frying. It uses a fan to blow hot air and “fry” foods. I should warn you that the texture is not the same as you would get from deep frying. french fries are great in the air fryer and chicken is good too, but chicken sometimes comes out dry. the taste is fine so if you like it then it’s a great investment to make.
Is deep fried foods bad for you? Well this is a tricky question but I’ll keep it short. Oils like cooking oils are hydrogenated oils are not the best kinds of fats for the body. Having deep fried foods once a week is fine and a few times a week for kids is fine too. But when bad fats mix with carbs then the body stores the fat and it can get toxic in time. this is something to worry about for adults. for kids, deep fried foods a few times a week is not a harmful thing. fats and cholesterol is needed to make more hormones and keep thyroids healthy. for kids, they can enjoy their french fries. having them everyday isn;t a good idea, they will learn bad eating habits and their body’s sense of food will literally change due to the gut bacteria changing. adding in variety with the fried foods spaced evenly apart is a good nutrition plan for kids. 
 
2. reheating chicken, eggs, beef and animal protein sources is just fine. it does not ruin the protein content of the food. infact, reheating destroys the bacteria that lives in cooler temperatures.you can heat on stove just fine as well.
 
Yes, the microwave is a bad thing because t it gives off radiation that is truly harmful for the body. so wether you want to use it or not  something you are going to have to decide. microwaves are easy and convenient but in the super long term, all that radiation does harm the body in a small amount.
 
But dont get too worried about the microwave becasue there are other more harmful aspects of our life that we should deal with, such as processed foods too high in refined sugar. foods high in sugar are directly linked to diabetes, and almost all metabolic related diseases. so, we should focus on cleaning up our food and lifestyle as opposed to worrying about microwave radiation. We have more people sick and dying from illness caused by radiation, than we have people dying from microwave radiation.
 
But if you can take the microwave out of your life then that would be a good choice.
 
Heating and reheating vegetables – veggies loose their vitamin and mineral content when we cook them. so heating them further destroys what ever is left. veggies comes with such an amazing spectrum of vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals that we NEED TO EAT THEM RAW or as closest to the raw state as possible. If you steam your veggies, you can freeze it then eat it after it thaws down to room temperature. You can also freeze veggies raw then steam them and it will still retain it’s vitamins and minerals to a well off state. deep cooking and heating veggies will destroy most of what it left, unfortunately. Veggies like carrots should be eaten steamed which activates the nutrients inside of it and makes it more bio available. 
 
3. Yes you can cook chicken, beef, fish, eggs and animal protein foods and freeze and eat up to 15 days. But I must emphasze that properly storing food will determine how fresh it tastes. You dont want bacteria to grow so it is a good idea to freeze them airtight.
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What Are You Addicted To?

“Behavioral addictions such as gambling, overeating, television compulsion, and internet addiction are similar to drug addiction except that the individual is not addicted to a substance, but he/she is addicted to the behavior or the feeling experienced by acting out the behavior.”

Behavioral science experts believe that all entities capable of stimulating a person can be addictive; and whenever a habit changes into an obligation, it can be considered as an addiction.

Researchers also believe that there are a number of similarities as well as some differences between drug addiction and behavioral addiction diagnostic symptoms.

The idea that true addictions can exist even in the absence of psychotropic drugs (behavioral addictions) was popularized by Peele. According to Peele, addicted individuals are dependent on a particular set of experiences, of which the reactions to a specific chemical substance is only one example.

Prevention & Early Education is the Solution 

Similar to substance abuse prevention, programs aimed at addicted individuals and specialized training can educate adolescents about the warning signs of online addiction, in order to assist the early detection of this disorder. For prevention of behavioral addiction (such as internet addiction) authorities, cultural institutions and parents should monitor the use of internet and teach to the adolescent and children, the useful and appropriate methods of internet use.

Similar to substance abuse prevention programs aimed at addicted persons, specialized training can educate adolescents about the warning signs of online addiction in order to assist early detection.

  1. Parents should inform their children about the negative consequences of overuse of the Internet and its moral deviations, in order to prevent addiction.
  2. Parents should monitor their children while using internet and teach them the useful and appropriate methods of internet use. This helps adolescents self-monitor their online use without abusing it.
  3. Behavior science professionals might help adolescents understand the factors underlying their online habits and reintegrate former activities into their lifestyles and aid to prevent suspected cases of online abuse.
  4. It is important to know that prevention programs for online abuse can reduce the occurrence of future incidents and decrease risk of internet addiction.
  5. One of the important ways to prevent internet addiction, is to treat risk factors such as loneliness, stress, depression and anxiety, which may trigger the addiction to the internet and should be treated. Mental health professionals should encourage individuals who overuse the internet, to seek treatment when problems emerge, and help them identify ways they may be using the internet to escape from real life.
  6. Authorities and cultural institutions have a duty of providing healthy and proper usage of the internet to individuals, especially adolescents who are most vulnerable, via mass media education and training. Therefore, the most important step in this field is education and information
  7. We should realize, however, that filtering is necessary and can limit the abuse of internet (using pornographic sites, etc) but it is temporary. In the current situation, the government must invest in immunization, strengthening of religious beliefs and improving the sprit. It seems that in such ways the correct usage of the internet in the community will be naturalized.
  8. Much research must be done to show that educational training programs on internet addiction have proven effective in preventing new cases and improving the satisfaction and cohesion with internet using.

Free Downloads ( 01 )

Too Much Screen Time by Chadd.org


Source: 

  1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3354400/
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3354400/#ref4

Featured Photo Credit : Addictions.com

 

Does Spot Reduction Work?

DOING ABS WILL GIVE YOU ABS?
 
In the sports industry we call this “spot reduction” meaning if you work a certain area, the fat in that area will decrease faster. This idea of sport reduction has been said to not work for decades, until in 2007, a study published in the American Journal of Physiology, Endocrinology and Metabolism by Dr. Bente Stallnecht confirmed that spot reduction does indeed occur. In the study, “intense localized exercise in one leg burned significantly more fat than in the non-exercised leg.”
 
So, this study answered the question once and for all. Yes, spot reduction does occur. Only one problem: it occurs on such an insignificant scale as to be useless. The amount of extra fat burned from the working leg in this study was like taking a few drops of water out of a lake.

 

Quick Facts

  1. Targeting stubborn body fat and “spot reduction” are two different things. It’s possible to get rid of stubborn body fat through diet, exercise, and supplementation.
  2. Subcutaneous fat is more stubborn than visceral fat and intramuscular fat. For women, it’s located around the butt, hips, and thighs. For men, it’s the love handles.
  3. Dieting by eating less and exercising more can make stubborn fat more stubborn. There are two exercise and diet strategies that prevent this.
  4. Supplements such as green tea extract, forskolin, and yohimbine HCL can help with stubborn body fat, once you get your diet in order.
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Visceral fat lies in the spaces between the abdominal organs and in an apron of tissue called the omentum. Subcutaneous fat is located between the skin and the outer abdominal wall- Harvard Medical 

 

What Is Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) ?

IBS, also known as spastic colon, is a common disease with no known cause or cure. The disease is characterized by alternating periods of remission and flareups. Symptom flareups tend to be dominated either by diarrhea or constipation, but they can include either, as well as abdominal discomfort, pain and bloating. Many patients manage IBS through a combination of pharmaceutical and alternative therapies, but no therapy is consistently effective for all people.

Photo credit: Gynecologist NYC

Some of the strongest scientific evidence for the effectiveness of vitamin D treatments comes from a study conducted by researchers from the University of Sheffield, England, and published in the journal BMJ Case Reports in December 2012.

The paper begins by reporting the case of a 41-year-old woman who had suffered from “severe, diarrhea-predominant IBS” for 25 years, and who had received an official diagnosis approximately 20 years prior to the study. She had undergone treatments with anti-spasmodic drugs, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants, and anti-microbial drugs, but none had any significant effect on her symptoms. Dietary therapies, including avoiding lactose and gluten, had provided more reliable symptom relief, but had not stopped her from having regular flareups. Likewise, she gained only minimal relief from other alternative treatments including colonic irrigation, counseling, hypnotherapy and the use of other supplements including aloe vera, caprylic acid, garlic oil, peppermint tea and probiotics.

Through social media, the woman learned that other sufferers head effectively used vitamin D3 as an IBS treatment.

“The patient now takes 2000-4000 IU vitamin D3 daily,” the researchers wrote. “Dosage varies according to season, 2000 IU in summer and 3-4000 IU in winter. Since commencing this supplementation regime, the subject experienced significant improvement in symptoms and now experiences near normal bowel habits. In 3 years of supplementation, relapses only occur if supplementation is ceased.”

Vitamin D supplementation also produced an end to her ongoing depression and anxiety problems, the researchers reported.
IBS, also known as spastic colon, is a common disease with no known cause or cure. The disease is characterized by alternating periods of remission and flareups. Symptom flareups tend to be dominated either by diarrhea or constipation, but they can include either, as well as abdominal discomfort, pain and bloating. Many patients manage IBS through a combination of pharmaceutical and alternative therapies, but no therapy is consistently effective for all people.

Some of the strongest scientific evidence for the effectiveness of vitamin D treatments comes from a study conducted by researchers from the University of Sheffield, England, and published in the journal BMJ Case Reports in December 2012.

The paper begins by reporting the case of a 41-year-old woman who had suffered from “severe, diarrhea-predominant IBS” for 25 years, and who had received an official diagnosis approximately 20 years prior to the study. She had undergone treatments with anti-spasmodic drugs, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants, and anti-microbial drugs, but none had any significant effect on her symptoms. Dietary therapies, including avoiding lactose and gluten, had provided more reliable symptom relief, but had not stopped her from having regular flareups. Likewise, she gained only minimal relief from other alternative treatments including colonic irrigation, counseling, hypnotherapy and the use of other supplements including aloe vera, caprylic acid, garlic oil, peppermint tea and probiotics.

Through social media, the woman learned that other sufferers head effectively used vitamin D3 as an IBS treatment.

“The patient now takes 2000-4000 IU vitamin D3 daily,” the researchers wrote. “Dosage varies according to season, 2000 IU in summer and 3-4000 IU in winter. Since commencing this supplementation regime, the subject experienced significant improvement in symptoms and now experiences near normal bowel habits. In 3 years of supplementation, relapses only occur if supplementation is ceased.”

Vitamin D supplementation also produced an end to her ongoing depression and anxiety problems, the researchers reported.

(Natural News Science)

Sources for this article include:

http://www.vitasearch.com/get-clp-summary/40529

http://www.vitamindcouncil.org

I Just Had My Baby & I Have No Energy to Workout!

Question : I didn’t start to workout yet. 4 months back I give birth to an amazing baby boy but since that I didn’t sleep well not once, I’m so so so tired, how can I start working out again ?!

Answer:

Congatulation on your baby boy! For now, you need rest and sleep and enough food. This is your main concern. Dont worry about exercise UNTIL you have your food and rest cycles under control. Here is the best advice any new mom can every get: PLAN YOUR OWN REST AND FOOD!

It can be easy to lose sight of your own needs. You are super excited with your baby and all your attention is directly going to him. Ignoring yourself is a natural instict but this is where many women make a mistake. Forgetting about your own health, mental wellness leads to you weakening in the long run.

PLAN YOUR MEALS: With sleep cycle already going crazy, you end up sleeping in weird times and this leads to missing some meals or not eating the proper type of food you need. You can start by writing down your sleep times and awake times and make a food plan. Dont forget to add in your timing of each meals. having something written down means your brain is already working on making it happen. Once you have real words on paper, you can tweak the times and meals to better place your food. Withing a few weeks you will get more comfortable at this and can easier manage your time.

WHAT TO EAT: This is where the question of energy gets answered. Lactating moms need to eat MORE FOOD. You need to support your own body plus make milk for your baby. Believe or not, your body now needs more nutrition to sustain all the work is has to to 24/7.

An average lactating mom needs to increase her caloric intake from 300-500 calories PER DAY.

BUT DON’T MAKE A MISTAKE IN EATING MORE OF THE WRONG FOOD. This means you have to eat more of the correct food such as more protein, mpre carbs and definitely more health fats such as ghee and coconut oil, omega 3 and omega 6 fats and dont forget your fish oil you can find from fresh roe or cold water fish (which are naturally lower in mercury content than warm water fish)

Add your specific meals into your daily meal plan. Don’t be afraid to eat more fats. fats are needed by the body to make more milk and keep your hormones balanced!

Protein: have a fresh range of lean red meat, chicken / poultry, whole eggs, and fresh cold water fish. It is best to do a simply research from your meat and fish supplier to make sure it is as toxic free as possible. dont ignore your protein intake, this makes your milk powerful and helps your baby’s organs and hormones also to grow powerful and strong. breastfeeding time is super crucial for baby growth in terms of brain, body and organ function.

Carbs: this is important. carbs that cause inflammation in the body should be avoided by all people and lactating moms should pay attention to this. carbs such as legumes have anti-nutrients that block absorption of proteins, so dont eat too much legumes or lentils. carbs such as gluten cause waste and toxic slush in the lower intestines that are hard to remove and cause leaky gut which further prevent nutrient absorption. fresh and clean carbs include potatoes and rice and oatmeal. off course you cant get bored of these 3 since there are tons of different recipes.

Fibre: most of your micro nutrients come from fresh and toxic free vegetables and fruits. 3 servings of fresh veg and 2 servings of vegetables daily is a minimum! keep those veggies colorful and fruits too. dark berries are rich in anti-oxidants, i love them !

Fats: ok back to fats, since they are so health and vital part of your baby’s growth and your wellbeing. Generally, an ounce (28 ml) of breast milk contains 19–23 calories, with 3.6–4.8% from protein, 28.8–32.4% from fat and 26.8–31.2% from carbs, mostly lactose. In fact, this milk may contain 2–3 times as much fat as milk from the beginning of a feeding, and 7–11 more calories per ounce.

FOR EXAMPLE:

Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is an essential long-chain omega-3 fatty acid that is mainly found in seafood, including fatty fish and algae. It is an important component of the central nervous system, skin and eyes. DHA is vital for healthy brain development and function.

Adding DHA to baby formula has also been shown to improve vision in babies. If your intake is low, then the amount in your breast milk will also be low. Early-life omega-3 deficiency has been linked to several behavioral problems, such as ADHD, learning disabilities and aggressiveness.

Therefore, it is recommended that pregnant and breastfeeding women take at least 2.6 grams of omega-3 fatty acids and 100–300 mg of DHA daily.

OK SO HAVE I SAID ENOUGH !
Work on your food and sleep. and let’s talk about your workout in a few weeks. share your plan with us so other can benefit and if you are interested in my Post-Pregnancy Transformation Programme or send me a email at marina.farook@gmail.com.